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Requirement of ship-shore insulating and earthing for chemical tankers

Insulating requirement: In order to provide protection against static electrical discharge (arcing) during cargo hose connection and disconnection, the terminal should have ensured that hose strings and metal arms are fitted with an insulating flange or a single length of non-conducting hose, to create electrical discontinuity between the ship and shore. All metal on the seaward side of the insulating section should be electrically continuous to the ship, and all metal on the landward side should be electrically continuous to the jetty earthing system.

The insulating flange or the single length of non-conducting hose must not be short-circuited; for example, an exposed metal flange on the seaward side of the insulating flange or hose length should not make, contact with the jetty structure directly or through hose handling equipment.

It should be noted that switching off a cathodic protection system is not a substitute for the installation of an insulating flange or a length of non-conducting hose.


Ship/shore bonding cables

A ship/shore bonding cable is not effective as a safety device and may be dangerous. A ship/shore bonding cable should therefore not be used.

Although the potential dangers of using a ship/shore bonding cable are widely recognised, attention is drawn to the fact that some national and local regulations may still require a bonding cable to be connected.

If a bonding cable is insisted upon, it should first be visually inspected to see, as best possible, that it is mechanically and electrically sound. The connection point for the cable should be well clear of the manifold area. There should always be a switch on the jetty in series with the bonding cable and of a type suitable for use in hazardous areas.

It is important always to ensure that the switch is in the open position before connecting or disconnecting the cable. Only when the cable is properly secured and in good contact with the ship should the switch be closed. The cable should be attached before the cargo hoses are connected and removed only after the hoses have been disconnected.






Related info:

Effects of Tugs and other craft alongside chemical tankers

Primary means of cargo connection between ship and shore

Means of access (gangways or accommodation ladders) safety precautions

Ship/Shore Safety Checklist

How to prepare a cargo loading / discharge plan ?

Technical readiness prior loading operations

Voyage planning and related considerations

Cargo sampling safety precautions

Cargo calculation

Signing a bill of lading and related guideline

Preparation for cargo operation

Preparing a cargo tank atmosphere

Cargo unloading operation safety precautions

Liaison between ship and shore

How to prevent cargo pipeline leakage

Ship shore safety checklist while alongside a terminal


Reference publications

  1. IBC Code / BCH code
  2. International Safety Guide for Oil Tankers and Terminals (ISGOTT)
  3. ICS Chemical Tanker Safety Guide
  4. Ship’s “Procedure and Arrangements Manual” (Approved by Class)
  5. Certificate of Fitness for the Carriage of Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk
  6. Ship’s “VEC System Operational Manual” (Approved by Class)
  7. Ship to Ship Transfer Guide (Petroleum)
  8. Tank Cleaning Manual




Other Info:

Voyage planning and related considerations

Preparation for cargo operation

Preparing a cargo tank atmosphere

Cargo unloading operation safety precautions

Liaison between ship and shore

Cargo line leakage countermeasures

Checklist for handling dangerous liquid chemicals in bulk

Recommended temperature monitoring equipments onboard

Practical example of solving tank cleaning problems

Pre-cleaning /washing of cargo tanks

Risk & hazards of chemical contamination onboard

Cargo compatibility and reactivity of various chemical cargo

Poisoning and required first aid treatment onboard

Chemical tanker safe mooring practice

Determining presence of contaminants in chemical cargo

How to avoid solidification in cargo tanks ?

Cargo segregation requirement for chemical tankers

How to arrange disposal of tank cleaning waste ?

Restrictions on discharge cargo residue into sea

Retention of slops on chemical tankers

Vapour emission control requirement for chemical tankers

Handling self reactive chemicals

Handling of toxic chemical cargoes

Pre-loading meeting safety consideration

How to determine chemical cargo temperatures at different level ?

How to take cargo samples ?

How to avoid solidification in cargo tanks ?

Cargo line clearance requirement for chemical tankers

How to arrange disposal of tank cleaning waste ?

Care of cargo pums - risk of pump overload or underload


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